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Hello there! I love writing poetry, and thinking introspectively about fictional characters' lives. Some things to know about me: KuroFai is my OTP to rule all OTPs, and Kurogane is my favorite character. I love Miyazaki movies. Case in point--Spirited Away is my favorite movie. My favorite book is Pride and Prejudice. My favorite songs are Pieces by Red, Gravity by Sara Bareilles, and Shattered by Trading Yesterday. My favorite manga is Tokyo Babylon. I am currently watching Code Geass. Have a great day!

townienews:

Tom Brady’s Special Congratulatory Message For Peyton Manning

I DARE YOU TO ANONYMOUSLY GIVE ME A NICKNAME

Plz I want nicknames

(Source: gallifreygabriel)

teenkouhi:

THATS NOT EVEN A WORD AND I AGREE WITH YA

teenkouhi:

THATS NOT EVEN A WORD AND I AGREE WITH YA

(Source: pperfectprincess)

How an African slave helped Boston fight smallpox - The Boston Globe

medievalpoc:

metaquarry:

medievalpoc:

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked. The story of how Boston began to overcome smallpox illustrates the strife that epidemics can cause, but also the encouraging notion that humans can communicate remedies as quickly as they communicate germs—and that the solutions we most need often come from the places we least expect to find them.

Mather had come close to choosing a career in medicine, and devoured the scientific publications of the Royal Society in London. As the society began to turn its attention to inoculation practices around the world, Mather realized that he had an extraordinary expert living in his household. Onesimus was a “pretty Intelligent Fellow,” it had become clear to him. When asked if he’d ever had smallpox, Onesimus answered “Yes and No,” explaining that he had been inoculated with a small amount of smallpox, which had left him immune to the disease. Fascinated, Mather asked for details, which Onesimus provided, and showed him his scar. We can almost hear Onesimus speaking in Mather’s accounts, for Mather took the unusual step of writing out his words with the African accent included—the key phrase was, “People take Juice of Small-Pox; and Cutty-skin, and Putt in a Drop.”

Excited, he investigated among other Africans in Boston and realized that it was a widespread practice; indeed, a slave could be expected to fetch a higher price with a scar on his arm, indicating that he was immune. Mather sent the Royal Society his own reports from the wilds of America, eager to prove the relevance of Boston (and by extension, Cotton Mather) to the global crusade against infectious disease. His interviews with Onesimus were crucial. In 1716, writing to an English friend, he promised that he would be ready to promote inoculation if smallpox ever visited the city again.

American History, but something I think a lot of people would be interested to read.

And here’s a biographical essay about Onesimus from the W.E.B. DuBois Research Center.

Thank you!

rohangoestohell:

IS HE FOR REAL ABOUT TO FIGHT THIS TEN YEAR OLD

watch this anime

HeLp how does one talk to attractive people without seeming like a total nerd?? 

teachers: so is everybody excited for the weekend
band kids: ha what weekend